Water

RWS Update

The following explains my decision to step down from the Royal Watercolour Society

The RWS (London) is the oldest and most prominent watercolour society in the world. As that beacon, one would want for the society to embrace all the exciting possibilities the medium holds. We have an abundance of artists at all levels exploring the medium in the UK: producing a wealth of innovative work by painting in watercolour on a wide array of non-traditional surfaces, as I myself do. For its shows and competitions, the society will accept only watercolours painted on paper. Upon election as a RWS associate, one of my key aims was to advocate for a broadening of the acceptance criteria. My non-traditional approach and use of watercolour upon found-objects was, after all, one reason I was invited by the society for interview in the first instance.

Two proposals to the council over the last two years – that the RWS should consider expanding the range of accepted production materials – have been denied and finally rejected outright. Although I understand the desire to honour long-standing traditions within such an established society, I personally do not feel that this ethos is compatible with my own ever-evolving and experimental practice. I firmly believe that creativity and innovations should not be bound and restricted by tradition, but should be a founding basis for a sustainable and supportive culture and development of that same tradition. For this reason, and with regret, I have decided to leave.

Many positions come and go during an artist’s working life. Sometimes one must try something out in order to determine if there is space for it to sit in harmony with one’s methods of creation. As an artist and a collaborator I have always endeavoured to avoid situations where restriction exists. In my career thus far I have spent time exploring a variety of ventures in order to help extend my practice, find balance and learn new skills that feed into my principal output.

It is an honour to be recognised by such a prominent institution. Yet – as in many aspects of life – if a scenario is incompatible it shouldn’t be pursued against one’s principles simply because it is associated with a level of prestige. Leaving is a step forward.

Above image: paintings in (mostly) watercolour & gouache upon a variety of found surfaces: wood, antique canvas, stone, card & metal.

Online Store: Charity Water

David Cass + Charity Water

The majority of my artworks are either sold at exhibitions or by commission, though I do keep a stock of small-works & studies available for sale online. Generally, these are works that are not part of a current exhibition program and so there is no conflict with active projects.

Almost every artwork I've ever made has been concerned with water in some way...

...and through online sales I – we – can support a groundbreaking charity that has already secured safe water for 7,347,032 people in need. Each of the paintings available for sale here carries that gift of safe, clean water. Because nobody on earth should die from dirty water. Each sale made [via the above linked page] will provide at least one person safe water for life.

In collaboration with charity: water, each individual artwork description states exactly how many people your purchase will benefit through their incredible work.

If this concept has swayed your decision to make a purchase, then please make use of the following code at the checkout for free postage: WATERCOLOUR.

663 million people on our planet drink dirty and dangerous water. Actually, they don’t just drink it, they work for it. They invest hours every day. And not only does it keep them out of school, or take up time that they could be using to earn money for their family, it also kills them. That’s not an exaggeration. Diseases from unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war. But access to clean water changes that. Clean water improves health, gives kids more time in school, empowers women, boosts economies, and gives hope for a brighter future. Clean water changes everything.

Feature: Conservation & Contemporary Art, Reina Sofia Madrid

Conservación de Arte Contemporáneo 16ª Jornada

Spanish art conservationist Alicia García (working most recently with the Museo del Prado) presented a protocol that she has constructed to archive current artworks for the future in this important publication (and lecture series) commissioned and led by the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid. In collaboration with the team of an artists' residency in rural southern Spain – Joya: arte + ecología – and artist Gonzaga Gómez-Cortázar who co-authored this book, Alicia set the location of this eco-residency as her testing ground, and I'm delighted to have been featured in the publication as a subject (p31). The totality of the artworks I created in this arid-zone in Almería were temporal - time based - and so documentation was vital. The success of these artworks will hang on the strength of their documentation. 

Authors: Carlota Santabárbara, Arianne Vanrell, Lydia Frasquet, Mª Teresa Pastor, Alicia García, Gonzaga Gómez-Cortázar, Elena García, Laura Limatola, Rosario Llamas, Camilla Vitti, Luiz Antonio Cruz, Magali Melleu, Katarzyna Zych, Ana Cudell, Heidi Belisario, José Frade, Paulo Magalhaes, Laura Castro, Carla Felizardo, Ana Calvo, Ana Martins, Pino Monkes, Fernando Marte, Mª Teresa Pastor, Camilla Vitti, Mario Anacleto de Sousa, Rosario Llamas, Sharon Avery-Fahlström, Juan Antonio Sáez, Christian Adrián, Humberto Durán, José Manuel Pereira, Almudena Rolle, María del Carmen Bellido, Maite Martínez, Isidre Sabater, Isabel álvarez, Rosalía Fernández, Enara Artetxe | Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía